Sunday, September 8, 2013

neck Spine muscles

Sub Occipital
suboccipital \-äk-ˈsip-ət-əl\ triangle noun
 a space of the suboccipital region on each side of the dorsal cervical region that is bounded superiorly and medially by a muscle arising by a tendon from a spinous process of the axis and inserting into the inferior nuchal line and the adjacent inferior region of the occipital bone, that is bounded superiorly and laterally by the obliquus capitis superior, and that is bounded inferiorly and laterally by the obliquus capitis inferior

Semispinalis
semi·spi·na·lis noun \-ˌspī-ˈnā-ləs\
plural ; semi·spi·na·les
any of three muscles of the cervical and thoracic parts of the spinal column that arise from transverse processes of the vertebrae and pass to spinous processes higher up and that help to form a layer underneath the sacrospinalis muscle:

a : semispinalis thoracis

b : semispinalis cervicis

c : semispinalis capitis

Longissimus
lon·gis·si·mus noun \län-ˈjis-i-məs\
plural ; lon·gis·si·mi
the intermediate division of the sacrospinalis muscle that consists of the longissimus capitis, longissimus cervicis, and longissimus thoracis; also : any of these three muscles


Splenius Cervicis
splenius \-nē-əs\ cer·vi·cis noun \-ˈsər-və-səs\
 a flat narrow muscle on each side of the back of the neck and the upper thoracic region that arises from the spinous processes of the third to sixth thoracic vertebrae, is inserted into the transverse processes of the first two or three cervical vertebrae, and acts to rotate the head to the side on which it is located and with the help of the muscle on the opposite side to extend and arch the neck

Splenius Capitis
splenius \-nē-əs\ cap·i·tis noun \-ˈkap-ət-əs\
 a flat muscle on each side of the back of the neck and the upper thoracic region that arises from the caudal half of the ligamentum nuchae and the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and the first three or four thoracic vertebrae, that is inserted into the occipital bone and the mastoid process of the temporal bone, and that rotates the head to the side on which it is located and with the help of the muscle on the opposite side extends it

Scalenes
sca·le·nus noun \skā-ˈlē-nəs\
plural ; sca·le·ni (audio pronunciation)
 any of usually three deeply situated muscles on each side of the neck of which each extends from the transverse processes of two or more cervical vertebrae to the first or second rib:

a  one arising from the transverse processes of the third to sixth cervical vertebrae, inserting on the scalene tubercle of the first rib, and functioning to bend the neck forward and laterally and to rotate it to the side—called also anterior scalene, scalenus anterior, scalenus anticus

b  one arising from the transverse processes of the lower six cervical vertebrae, inserting on the upper surface of the first rib, and functioning similarly to the scalenus anterior—called also middle scalene, scalenus medius

c  one arising from the transverse processes of the fourth to sixth cervical vertebrae, inserting on the outer surface of the second rib, and functioning to raise the second rib and to bend and slightly rotate the neck—called also posterior scalene, scalenus posterior


Deep Muscles of the Spine


Interspinalis:
in·ter·spi·na·lis noun
\ˌint-ər-ˌspī-ˈnal-əs, -ˈnā-ləs\
plural ; in·ter·spi·na·les
 any of various short muscles that have their origin on the superior surface of the spinous process of one vertebra and their insertion on the inferior surface of the contiguous vertebra above

Intertransversarii:
in·ter·trans·ver·sar·ii noun pl
\-ˌtran(t)s-vər-ˈser-ē-ˌī\
 a series of small muscles connecting the transverse processes of contiguous vertebrae and most highly developed in the neck

Rotatores
ro·ta·tor noun \ˈrō-ˌtāt-ər also rō-ˈ\
plural ; rotatorsor ; ro·ta·to·res
 a muscle that partially rotates a part on its axis; specifically : any of several small muscles in the dorsal region of the spine arising from the upper and back part of a transverse process and inserted into the lamina of the vertebra above

Multifidus
mul·tif·i·dus noun \ˌməl-ˈtif-ə-dəs\
plural ; mul·tif·i·di
 a muscle of the fifth and deepest layer of the back filling up the groove on each side of the spinous processes of the vertebrae from the sacrum to the skull and consisting of many fasciculi that pass upward and inward to the spinous processes and help to erect and rotate the spine

iliocostalis
il·io·cos·ta·lis noun \-käs-ˈtā-ləs\
 the lateral division of the sacrospinalis muscle that helps to keep the trunk erect and consists of three parts:

a : iliocostalis cervicis

b : iliocostalis lumborum

c : iliocostalis thoracis

Longissimus
lon·gis·si·mus noun \län-ˈjis-i-məs\
plural ; lon·gis·si·mi
 the intermediate division of the sacrospinalis muscle that consists of the longissimus capitis, longissimus cervicis, and longissimus thoracis; also : any of these three muscles

Spinalis
spi·na·lis noun \spī-ˈnā-ləs, spi-ˈna-lis\
plural ; spi·na·les
 the most medial division of the sacrospinalis situated next to the spinal column and acting to extend it or any of the three muscles making up this division:

a : spinalis thoracis

b : spinalis cervicis

c : spinalis capitis

Semispinalis
semi·spi·na·lis noun \-ˌspī-ˈnā-ləs\
plural ; semi·spi·na·les
 any of three muscles of the cervical and thoracic parts of the spinal column that arise from transverse processes of the vertebrae and pass to spinous processes higher up and that help to form a layer underneath the sacrospinalis muscle:

a : semispinalis thoracis

b : semispinalis cervicis

c : semispinalis capitis